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Alex Ogg

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Discussions of punk tend to focus on groups, like the Ramones, Sex Pistols, The Clash, and the punk scenes of New York, London, and Los Angeles. Punk, however, was a broader musical cultural movement and sprung up in multiple locations.

The Dead Kennedys hailed from the San Francisco punk scene and were important punk and cultural icons through the 1980s. In his new book, Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables: The Early Years (PM Press, 2014), Alex Ogg examines the genesis of this seminal album and captures both the tension between the band members and the beautiful marriage of witty lyrics and musical virtuosity. In the podcast, we explore the San Francisco punk scene, the innovative nature of the Dead Kennedys, and their legacy.

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Nick CrossleyNetworks of Sound, Style, and Subversion: The Punk and Post-Punk Worlds of Manchester, London, Liverpool, and Sheffield, 1975-80

May 18, 2015

Can sociology explain punk? In a new book, Networks of Sound, Style, and Subversion: The Punk and Post-Punk Worlds of Manchester, London, Liverpool, and Sheffield, 1975-80 (Manchester University Press, 2015), Nick Crossley from the University of Manchester offers an important new perspective on the birth of punk and post-punk in London, Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield in […]

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Donald DeardorffBruce Springsteen: American Poet and Prophet

February 19, 2015

Bruce Springsteen is an American icon, known to his fans as “Bruce” and the “Boss.” Springsteen burst onto the American music scene in 1975 with the release of his classic album, Born To Run. His concerts are legendary, and his music offers keen insight on American society. In Bruce Springsteen: American Poet and Prophet (Scarecrow […]

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Heather AugustynSka: The Rhythm of Liberation

February 2, 2015

What is Ska music? This is a deceptively complicated question. In this podcast Heather Augustyn, the author of Ska: The Rhythm of Liberation (Scarecrow Press, 2013) discusses ska’s journey from a local music in 1950s and 1960s Jamaica, its journey to Great Britain and its fusion with punk and other 1970s musical forms, and then its arrival […]

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Sherrie TuckerDance Floor Democracy: The Social Geography of Memory at the Hollywood Canteen

January 19, 2015

Cultural memory of World War II frequently draws on swing music and the USO dance floor as symbols of how the country came together in support of the war effort. Frequently, the term “the Greatest Generation” is used to exemplify patriotism and self-sacrifice. Digging beyond nostalgic remembrances, Sherrie Tucker’s Dance Floor Democracy: The Social Geography of […]

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Rachel Clare Donaldson“I Hear America Singing”: Folk Music and National Identity

November 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Culture] The last few decades has seen a turn toward traditional forms of American music; call it Americana, alternative country, or a new folk revival.  In “I Hear America Singing”: Folk Music and National Identity (Temple University Press, 2014), Rachel Clare Donaldson, an independent scholar based in Baltimore, offers a history of the […]

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Nadine HubbsRednecks, Queers, and Country Music

November 5, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Culture] Academics don't pay enough attention to class.  And when we do, too often we only magnify the tendency for working class subjects to be defined according to middle class norms; and according to those norms, they, not surprisingly, fail in one way or another, justifying their position beneath the […]

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Randal DoaneStealing All Transmissions: A Secret History of the Clash

October 22, 2014

Who are the Clash? How did they become the “only band that matters”? In this podcast, Randal Doane, the author of Stealing All Transmissions: A Secret History of the Clash (PM Press, 2014), discusses the American context of the Clash’s popularity and their generally positive reception by FM free form deejays and rock critics. The podcast […]

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Adrienne Trier-BieniekSing Us a Song, Piano Woman: Female Fans and the Music of Tori Amos

September 30, 2014

What are female fans of popular music seeking and hearing when they listen to music and attend concerts? In an innovative and fascinating study entitled Sing Us a Song, Piano Woman: Female Fans and the Music of Tori Amos (The Scarecrow Press, 2013)  Adrienne Trier-Bieniek goes inside the fan culture that surrounds Tori Amos and examines […]

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Tim AndersonPopular Music in a Digital Music Economy: Problems and Practices for an Emerging Service Industry

August 23, 2014

Since the 1990s, the music industry has been going through a massive transformation. After World War II, the primary way audiences participated in the music business in the period between 1945 and 1990 was by purchasing records and attending concerts. The internet and the mp3 file, however, have changed how people are listening to music. […]

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